It's Non-Negotiable – You Must Believe in Yourself

The ability to believe in yourself can change your life.

What difference would it make in your life if you thought you were outrageously wonderful every day? What if you had an unshakable confidence in your ability to achieve anything and the resilience to power through it?

What would you dare to dream if you believed in yourself with such deep conviction that you had no fears of failure whatsoever?

The biggest difference between successful people and unsuccessful people isn't intelligence or opportunity or resources. It's the belief that they can – really CAN – make their dreams happen.

After all, we all deal with vulnerability, uncertainty and failure. Some of us have a certain faith and courage that if we move forward anyway, we will figure it out.

No one, including yourself, has any idea of your capabilities or of what you might ultimately do and become. Perhaps the hardest thing to do in life is to accept how extraordinary you really can be, believe in yourself, and then make it happen. I dare you to believe in yourself. Every day. Why are we always hungry?

• You need to get better sleep.
Sleep is important for basically everything you do during your waking hours. "When we don't sleep enough, it increases our hunger hormone, ghrelin, which can increase our appetite and make us think we're more hungry than usual," says Dr. William Barrett from the Barrett Cancer Center at UC. Studies show that sleep-deprived participants are unable to resist sweet snacks and can eat nearly twice as much fat when they are exhausted. "Making your sleep a priority can help regulate your appetite all day long," says Barrett.

• You're not drinking enough water.
It's normal to confuse thirst with hunger. In order to make sure you are staying adequately hydrated, experts agree that you should be drinking about half of your body weight in ounces of water every day.

• You're not fueling with the right foods.
Your body needs a range of foods to feel full. "There are three macronutrients — protein, carbohydrates and fat — that work together to provide your body the energy it needs," said Matt Frondorf from JackRabbit. "Missing the mark on any of these three things could have a negative effect on satiety and fullness levels."

• You're just not eating enough.
There are loads of factors that prevent us from eating enough to fuel our bodies throughout the day. Maybe you're trying out a new limiting diet, or perhaps you skipped lunch because you were on deadline at work. Be sure you are getting enough to eat.

• You might just be emotionally hungry.
If you've eaten full meals all day, and you're still ravenous and craving something super specific, like chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream, take a step back and evaluate how you feel. "Maybe it's stress. Maybe it's boredom. Sometimes emotional hunger can be confused for physical hunger," says Barrett.


Does running ruin your knees and cause osteoarthritis?

No! Numerous studies have compared groups of runners and non-runners over the course of many decades and found no evidence that runners are more likely to develop knee osteoarthritis or need knee replacements. In fact, in many studies runners seem to be less likely to develop knee problems, perhaps due to their lower weight, reduced systemic inflammation, and the ability of cartilage to adapt and get stronger in response to regular exercise.


What are some great ways to motivate yourself to exercise?

• Become an early bird.
"Willpower isn't an unlimited resource — the more you use it throughout the day, the less you have left at night to force yourself to work out," say the performance specialists at Team Ignition. "Also, if you wait until later in the day, it's a lot likelier that things will pop up and get in the way of working out."

• Get other people involved.
"Find a friend who likes the same things you do, like running, playing volleyball or canoeing," says JackRabbit's Matt Frondorf, who organizes training groups for runners. "It provides accountability. It's social. It's fun."

• Set smaller goals.
"Most of the time, people don't work out because it seems like an intimidating, daunting task," says Meredith Hogan from Modo Yoga. "But you don't have to run a 10-miler or spend hours at a gym. Find something you love and just keep 'playing' at it."

• Keep equipment in a 'good' place.
"Sometimes a simple thing like putting your workout equipment in a central room — not by the washing machine in the basement — can be inspiring," says Team Ignition.

• Find a fun gym that's close to your work or home.
"If it's too far away or not inviting, you just won't go," says Hogan. "Invest in a workout place that you love."

• Involve the family.

"Family time is more important than ever, so try activities like hiking at the park or walking downtown with the kids," says Frondorf.


What top three things keep you from being productive?

• Distractions
"The workplace is an inherently distracting place," said John Barrett, CEO of Western & Southern. "Enter any office and you'll see people meeting in conference rooms, walking around, and talking by the coffee machine. In addition, we all own devices that demand our attention 24/7. As a result, we are constantly interrupted."

• Personal reasons
Life is demanding. "Some of us work over 10 hours a day. That leaves us only a few hours for personal things – relationships, family, groceries, and exercise," said Alvin Roehr, CEO of The Roehr Agency. "As a result, we're too tired for just about everything."

• Not enough training
"Although we want to be more focused at work, more engaged in our personal lives, and live lives that matter, it can be very hard to find the right time to tackle the training to make it all happen," says Barrett.


What five questions do famous leaders say you should ask yourself every day?

• Can I commit to this for the long haul?
"While today's culture might push for immediate gratification, and while it's impossible to know what other opportunities might come to you, if you don't currently feel willing to stick with the hard work of a project or idea for years, your passion for that project might need reevaluation," says Warren Buffet.

• Is what I'm about to do worthy of the last day of my life?
"I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: 'If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?'" said Steve Jobs. "And whenever the answer has been 'no' for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something."

"The idea here is to get clarity about what matters most to you," says John Barrett, CEO of Western & Southern. "And commit to it as if you might never get the opportunity to do so again."

• Am I offering an example of integrity and how to do things right?
"Your first job is your most important," says Alibaba co-founder Jack Ma. "Not necessarily a company that has a great name, but you should find a boss that can teach you how to be a human being, how to do things properly, and stay there."

"This quote should inspire us not only to find mentors with integrity and knowledge but to be a teacher ourselves," says Alvin Roehr, CEO of the Roehr Agency.

• What would I do if I weren't afraid?
"We often stay in what we perceive to be the safest, but those things don't inspire or fulfill us," says Facebook CEO Sheryl Sandberg. "Everything has risk and the potential for failure and judgment, so let go of the fear and try what excites and interests you most."

• Am I giving the same support I want for myself to others?
"Greatness comes not from a position but from helping build the future," says Barrett. "Make people your priority and, even as you improve their lives, they will lift you where you want to go."